Emet Prize Laureates

Ms. Ronit Matalon


2016 Laureates of Emet Prize

In Category: Culture and Art
In Field: Hebrew Literature and Poetry

Ronit Matalon

Jury Statement

“The Emet Prize is awarded to the Author Ronit Matalon for her literary achievements and for her unique and innovative contribution to the field of Hebrew writing and reading over the last decades.”

C.V.

Author and essayist Ronit Matalon was born in 1959 in Ganei Tikva, a shantytown which housed people evacuated from the transit camps in the 1950s. She studied Literature and Philosophy at Tel Aviv University. Between 1993 and 2001 she was a faculty member at the Camera Obscura school for the arts in Tel Aviv, where she taught screenplay writing. She also taught for one year at the Open University in Tel Aviv and was a guest lecturer, at the rank of Associate Professor, in the Department of Hebrew Literature at Ben Gurion University. She was a guest author at Tel Aviv University and at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem. In 2009 she was appointed as Associate Professor, and later Full Professor, at the Faculty of Hebrew and Comparative Literature at Haifa University, where she heads the M.A. creative writing program.

Over the years she has published four novels, the most well-known of which are The One Facing Us (1995) and The Sound of Our Steps (2007), as well as short stories including the anthology Strangers at Home, articles, essays, and literary criticism. Her first book, A Story that Begins with a Snake’s Funeral, was published in 1989 and adapted for the screen in 1994.

In addition to writing and academic teaching, she serves as a judge in literary competitions and as an expert reviewer of screenplays, films and documentaries. She has participated in many conferences and has been a guest lecturer at countless forums, seminars and workshops in Israel and worldwide.

Her work has earned her grants and awards including the Prime Minister’s Award for Literature, the Bernstein Prize for Literature, the Neuman Prize for lifetime achievement in Hebrew Literature and the Alberto Benveniste Prize from the Sorbonne Unversity in Paris. The Hebrew University awarded her an honorary doctorate.