Emet Prize Laureates

Prof. Eliav Shochetman


2011 Laureates of Emet Prize

In Category: Humanities
In Field: Jewish law

Jewish Law

Prof. Eliav Shochetman

Jury Statement

“For his scientific work over many years researching Jewish law and the interaction between the State and the Halacha and between Jewish law and State law, and spreading Jewish law orally and in writing.”

C.V.

Was born in Haifa.

He studied at “Netiv Meir” Yeshiva in Jerusalem and later at “Mercaz HaRav” Yeshiva.

During the Six Day War, he fought in the battle on Jerusalem and in the Yom Kippur War, he fought on the southern front.

He graduated from the Faculty of Law at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem, and continued his studies for the LL.M. degree. He completed his doctorate on the topic of “Illegal Act in Jewish Law” in 1975. While working at the Hebrew University, he taught at various academic institutions and was a visiting scholar at the Center for Jewish Studies at Harvard University. He participated in preparing the first curriculum for the Institution for Training Women as Advocates in Rabbinical Courts, and taught in that program for seven years.

Today his academic activities are based mainly at “Sha’arai Mishpat” law school, where he served as Dean, and continues to play a central role.

Since 1982, he has been a member of the editorial staff of the Annual of the Institute for Research in Jewish Law. His main field of research is Jewish law and its application to Israeli law. Within this framework he deals especially with family law, an area in which – according to Israeli legislation – Jewish law applies to the Jewish citizens and residents of Israel. His research partially touches on the relationship between state and law and Jewish law, and the interface between the jurisprudence of the rabbinical courts and that of the Supreme Court.

His scientific work includes research on the works of Maimonides and on the works of other prominent Jewish scholars (including Rabbi Joseph Karo, Rabbi Bezalel Ashkenazi and others). Over the past few years his research activity has focused on the subject of Civil Procedure in Rabbinical Courts, and he was a member of the committee for procedural regulations in the Rabbinical Courts. His work awarded him many prizes, including a prize in memory of Dr. Yacov Hertzog for Jewish Law research, the prize for Jewish Law research in memory of Moshe Silberg, the Jerusalem Prize for Halachic literature in memory of HaRav Kook, and the Tel-Aviv prize for Halachic literature in memory of HaRav Kook.